Bhi Jinah: The Nothing People

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Portrait of a typical Bhi Jinah

Supposing you knew — not by sight or by instinct, but by sheer intellectual knowledge, as I know the truth of a mathematical proposition — that what we call empty space was full, crammed. Not with lumps of what we call matter like hills and houses, but with things as real — as real to the mind. (John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir)

According to the Epic of the Sacred Cone, Bhi Jinah are strategic creatures populating the gaps between the physical forms ordinarily seen by human beings. They abide in areas commonly defined as nothing, empty or vacuum. Their aim is indeed drawing attention to the fullness of such nothingness and making human beings aware of the connection and unity that exists among everyone and everything. Bhi Jinah are a sort of spiritual glue that joins all fragmented parts. They constitute the linking agent of the web of life.

Bhi Jinah operate as a primordial elemental ocean that keeps whatever exists together. Their role is essential in all kinds of relationship. If partners are aware of such beings and encourage them to join in their relationship, ecstatic shifts can happen. To perceive Bhi Jinah, the only condition is that of accepting to see them and letting go of the hallucination of separation. Certain conditions or practices easily enhance this process.

Bhi Jinah are often experienced as living joyful puppets or cartoons of different forms and size. Most of them wear a conic hat and also a tea-shirt with a cone printed on it. They are often seen smiling, laughing and having great fun. At times, depending on the sector they belong to and the situation of their environment, they can also appear to be rather mischievous and restless.

Besides Bhi Jinah, there are also other strategic astroshamanic beings too, such as Graha, Sadoha, Paheka, etc. Well, I am not going into these now…. One thing to keep in mind is that all we see is the result of what we have chosen to see or not to see. Bhi Jinah have taught me this lesson. If I look around, I can notice that the majority of the spaces that I see are apparently empty and unoccupied by forms. Actually, from a spiritual perspective as well as from a scientific view, nothing is really empty or meaningless. It is just the conventional mind that accepts seeing only what supports its paradigm and refuses to acknowledge what would threaten it. This is the reason why Bhi Jinah are not usually seen: they would virtually blow up the entire foundation of our conditioned perception.

Since I was a child I would notice things and beings that my parents, relatives and whoever was around me did not appear to see. At the beginning I was sure that, as I was just a small boy, they would shut me up or pretend that such things did not exist simply because it was a matter for adult people only. My assumption was that all adults knew everything about such beings and could even see much more than what I was able to see, yet for some mysterious reasons they were not allowed to talk with children about them. There were some exceptions though, such as my grandmother, and there were also many books on the topic, depicting abundant and coloured images of such beings. Yet whenever I insisted on getting more information on them, adults would regularly feel embarrassed or irritated, and find ways to direct the conversation in another direction.

A Bhi Jinah village

A Bhi Jinah village

I was sure that all the information about such creatures was being kept secret on purpose and disclosed only when one was of age. There were many things that could only be done after reaching the age of 18, like driving a car, voting, getting married, being allowed to watch certain movies, etc. Thus, I thought that receiving knowledge about Bhi Jinah and the like, together with my true purpose in this world, which was also an obscure topic, was only a question of becoming of age.

On my 18th birthday I envisaged that a special authority would arrange a meeting for me. There I would go, accompanied by my parents, and all the secrets of life would be revealed to me. I just had to be patient and wait. In the meantime, I could relax and behave like a child, doing my homework, going to school, playing silly games, visiting relatives, etc. I would try hard and do such things only to be entitled to adulthood, and to the supposed revelation of all secrets. At last, when I was alone, I could eventually enjoy the company of Bhi Jinah without any limitation.

I was aware that my connection with the Bhi Jinah was rather childish. I didn’t have any clue about what they truly were, just as I also did not know who I was myself. I liked to spend a lot of time playing with the Bhi Jinah, also drawing maps of the countries where they were supposed to come from. Yet, so as not to create suspects in adult people, I would pretend to do my homework or to play with some silly toys.

I was very intrigued by Bhi Jinah and other non-ordinary topics, and would often ask questions to my parents. They would reply giving queer explanations or saying that I had to wait until I grew older. As a result I used to listen with much interest to my parents’ conversations with their adult relatives and friends. What they said was gibberish to me, especially when my mother spoke Bolognese with her relatives or my father Sicilian with his. When I heard such discussions, I was sure that they were about the issues I was craving to have explanations about.

Hence I was really looking forward to becoming an adult.

The first step in becoming an adult, I was told, involved going to school and studying hard. My parents kept repeating it. One day they also explained that in their times they could not go to school for their families were very poor and also because of the war. They said “Franco, our parents could not afford to send us to school. We have worked since we were young and cannot provide the answers you ask. Yet, we are going to do the best for you so that you can study and get to know all you want”. How honest of them to admit that! I realised that I could not expect my parents to teach me certain things, also because since they had not attended school they were not completely adult. Yet I would have learned them from true adults at school.

When eventually my school years began, despite all my initial excitement I was rather disappointed. Teachers would not care at all about Bhi Jinah and alike. I therefore assumed that it was a matter for more advanced schools. I looked forward to stepping into secondary school and university. When I did, I was even more dissatisfied and frustrated.

I have no words to describe the pain, confusion and isolation experienced in my school years. I was puzzled about what was going on. The things I was required to study did not make much sense to me, although they appeared valuable for others, while what made sense for me did not make any sense to others.

Only years later, I began to get the first answers to my questions probably, I daresay, from the Bhi Jinah themselves. Much to my amazement they did not come from school, parents, relatives or religious or state authorities. Yet paradoxically they has also come for them. Indeed, since I was born I had always been given such answers no matter what the source was, and still I appear to keep receiving no matter whether this happens in a shamanic journey or by reading a daily newspaper.

It is a long story and I am still trying to put it together, and perhaps there is no point of putting it together because it is already perfect as it is. Upon looking back at my life now, I can only rejoice at the fact that my past is now making a lot of sense. I regard it as part of a comprehensive set of lessons that I have chosen to receive.

Thanks Bhi Jinah, parents, teachers and whomever I have had the honour of meeting on my path.

© 2003 Franco Santoro, Cluny Hill College, Forres IV36 2RD, Scotland
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